Thursday, June 30, 2022

CALIFORNIA LONG GRAIN RICE



Our long grain rice is low in fat with no artificial colors or flavors. This type is extremely versatile and can be used in any side dish.

Non-GMO
Gluten Free
Vegan
Locally grown

4758 Midway
Richvale, CA 95974

info@richvalenaturalfoods.com
530.882.4326

Contact Us
Website

Friday, June 24, 2022

CALIFORNIA JASMINE RICE

An aromatic long grain rice with lineage that traces back to Thailand. This particular variety is brand new to California and is exclusive to Richvale Natural Foods.

True Jasmine

Non-GMO

Vegan

Gluten-Free

Locally Grown


4758 Midway
Richvale, CA 95974

info@richvalenaturalfoods.com
530.882.4326

Contact Us
Website

Tuesday, June 21, 2022

CALIFORNIA BASMATI RICE


A fragrant basmati type known as "Calmati" in California. We are the only rice farm to grow this unique variety in recent years. An excellent locally-grown alternative, our quality is comparable to that of truly authentic basmati from India.

Superior Quality
Non-GMO
Vegan
Gluten-Free
Locally Grown

4758 Midway
Richvale, CA 95974

info@richvalenaturalfoods.com
530.882.4326

Contact Us
Website



Saturday, June 18, 2022

COCONUT CHICKPEA RICE RECIPE | EASY VEGAN DINNER IDEA | COCONUT MILK BAS...


 LEARN HOW TO MAKE COCONUT CHICKPEA BASMATI RICE RECIPE

LAY HO MA!!  This rice dish is a real treat.  It's incredible fragrant, salty, sweet, smokey, and absolutely delicious.  Join me and learn how to make this beautiful coconut chickpea fried rice recipe.  Let's begin.

Ingredients:
1 cup basmati rice
1 cup coconut milk
1/2 red onion
1/4 cup hazelnuts
1 cup broccolini (chopped)
1 tbsp coconut oil
1 cup canned chickpeas
1/2 tbsp garlic powder
1 tsp chili powder
1 tbsp smoked paprika
2 tsp turmeric
generous pinch of salt
1/2 cup shredded coconut
few sprigs cilantro

Directions:
1. Place 1 cup of basmati rice into a small sauce pan.  Wash and drain the rice a couple of times to get rid of the excess starch
2. Toast the rice for a couple of minutes on medium high heat.  Then, add in 1 cup of coconut milk
3. When the milk starts to bubble, give the rice a good stir to make sure nothing is grabbing the bottom of the pan.  Then, cover and cook on medium low for 15min
4. Dice the red onion, coarsely chop the hazelnuts, and chop the broccolini
5. After 15min, turn the heat off and let the rice steam further for 10min
6. Heat up a non stick pan on medium heat.  Add the coconut oil
7. Add the red onion and chickpeas followed by the garlic powder, chili powder, smoked paprika, turmeric, and salt
8. Add in the hazelnuts and broccolini
9. Sauté for 3-4min
10. Add the shredded coconut.  Sauté for another couple of minutes and taste and adjust the seasoning if needed
11. Plate the rice and add the coconut chickpeas on top.  Garnish with some freshly chopped cilantro

4758 Midway
Richvale, CA 95974

info@richvalenaturalfoods.com
530.882.4326

Contact Us
Website


Wednesday, June 15, 2022

Rice Cultivars


This is a list of rice cultivars, also known as rice varieties. There are several species of grain called rice. Asian rice (Oryza sativa) is most widely known and most widely grown, with two major subspecies (indica and japonica) and over 40,000 varieties. Also included in this list are varieties of African rice (Oryza glaberrima) and wild rice (genus Zizania).

Rice may vary in genetics, grain length, color, thickness, stickiness, aroma, growing method, and other characteristics, leading to a vast number of cultivars. For instance, over nine major cultivars of rice exist for the purpose of making sake alone. The two subspecies of Asian rice, indica and japonica, can generally be distinguished by length and stickiness. Indica rice is long-grained and unsticky, while japonica is short-grained and glutinous.

Rice can also be divided on the basis of processing type into the two broad categories of brown and white. Brown rice is whole grain, with only the inedible hull of the seed removed, while white rice additionally has the bran and germ removed through the process of milling. Milled rice may not necessarily actually be white in color; there are purple, black, and red variants of rice, which can be eaten whole grain or milled.

The cultivars listed in this article may vary in any number of these characteristics, and most can be eaten whole grain or milled (brown or white), although there are often strong cultural preferences for one or the other, depending on variety and region.

Read more, here.

4758 Midway
Richvale, CA 95974

info@richvalenaturalfoods.com
530.882.4326

Contact Us
Website

Sunday, June 12, 2022

Cultural Roles of Rice

Rice plays an important role in certain religions and popular beliefs. In many cultures relatives will scatter rice during or towards the end of a wedding ceremony in front of the bride and groom.

The pounded rice ritual is conducted during weddings in Nepal. The bride gives a leafplate full of pounded rice to the groom after he requests it politely from her.

In the Philippines rice wine, popularly known as tapuy, is used for important occasions such as weddings, rice harvesting ceremonies and other celebrations.

Dewi Sri is the traditional rice goddess of the Javanese, Sundanese, and Balinese people in Indonesia. Most rituals involving Dewi Sri are associated with the mythical origin attributed to the rice plant, the staple food of the region. In Thailand, a similar rice deity is known as Phosop; she is a deity more related to ancient local folklore than a goddess of a structured, mainstream religion. The same female rice deity is known as Po Ino Nogar in Cambodia and as Nang Khosop in Laos. Ritual offerings are made during the different stages of rice production to propitiate the Rice Goddess in the corresponding cultures.

A 2014 study of Han Chinese communities found that a history of farming rice makes cultures more psychologically interdependent, whereas a history of farming wheat makes cultures more independent.

A Royal Ploughing Ceremony is held in certain Asian countries to mark the beginning of the rice planting season. It is still honored in the kingdoms of Cambodia and Thailand. The 2,600-year-old tradition – begun by Śuddhodana in Kapilavastu – was revived in the republic of Nepal in 2017 after a lapse of a few years.

Thai king Vajiralongkorn released five particular rice varieties to celebrate his coronation.

Read more, here.

4758 Midway
Richvale, CA 95974

info@richvalenaturalfoods.com
530.882.4326

Contact Us
Website

Thursday, June 9, 2022

THIS ONE POT LENTIL RICE RECIPE WILL PAN OUT AMAZING


LEARN HOW TO MAKE AN EASY ONE PAN LENTIL RICE RECIPE TODAY!

LAY HO MA!  Imagine a bowl of hot fluffy rice flavoured with garlic, onions, spices, and tomato - this is definitely going to be a weekly favourite. Join me in this episode and learn how to make a delicious and easy one pan lentil rice recipe.  Let's begin

Ingredients:
1 cup brown lentils
1 cup basmati rice
3 pieces garlic
small piece ginger
1 red onion
1 tomato
2 tbsp olive oil
pinch of salt
1/2 tsp cumin
1/2 tsp chili powder (cayenne pepper)
1 1/2 tsp sweet paprika
1 tsp coriander
pepper to taste
1 1/2 cups veggie stock
few lemon wedges
few sprigs parsley

Directions:
1. Place the brown lentils into a large bowl.  Fill with about 3 cups of water and let it soak for 8 hours or overnight.  Then, strain out the lentils and set aside 
2. Rinse and drain the basmati rice two to three times.  Then, set aside 
3. Finely chop the garlic and ginger.  Dice the red onion and tomato 
4. Heat up a sauté pan to medium heat.  Add the olive oil and red onions.  Sauté for 4-5min 
5. Add the garlic and ginger.  Sauté for 1-2min.  Add the lentils and sauté for about 1min 
6. Add the rice, salt, cumin, chili powder (or cayenne pepper), sweet paprika, coriander, and pepper 
7. Add the tomato and sauté for about 1min.  Add the veggie stock and give the pan a stir to deglaze 
8. Turn the heat to medium high and bring to a boil.  Then, cover and cook on medium low for 15min.  After 15min, turn the heat off and let the rice continue to steam covered for a further 10min 
9. Plate the rice and garnish with fresh lemon juice, parsley, a drizzle of olive oil, and freshly cracked pepper

4758 Midway
Richvale, CA 95974

info@richvalenaturalfoods.com
530.882.4326

Contact Us
Website

Monday, June 6, 2022

Flood/Drought/Salt-tolerant Rice

Flood-tolerant rice
Due to the varying levels that water can reach in regions of cultivation, flood tolerant varieties have long been developed and used. Flooding is an issue that many rice growers face, especially in South and South East Asia where flooding annually affects 20 million hectares (49 million acres). Standard rice varieties cannot withstand stagnant flooding of more than about a week, mainly as it disallows the plant access to necessary requirements such as sunlight and essential gas exchanges, inevitably leading to plants being unable to recover. In the past, this has led to massive losses in yields, such as in the Philippines, where in 2006, rice crops worth $65 million were lost to flooding. Recently developed cultivars seek to improve flood tolerance.

Drought-tolerant rice
Drought represents a significant environmental stress for rice production, with 19–23 million hectares (47–57 million acres) of rainfed rice production in South and South East Asia often at risk. Under drought conditions, without sufficient water to afford them the ability to obtain the required levels of nutrients from the soil, conventional commercial rice varieties can be severely affected—for example, yield losses as high as 40% have affected some parts of India, with resulting losses of around US$800 million annually.

The International Rice Research Institute conducts research into developing drought-tolerant rice varieties, including the varieties 5411 and Sookha dhan, currently being employed by farmers in the Philippines and Nepal respectively. In addition, in 2013 the Japanese National Institute for Agrobiological Sciences led a team which successfully inserted the DEEPER ROOTING 1 (DRO1) gene, from the Philippine upland rice variety Kinandang Patong, into the popular commercial rice variety IR64, giving rise to a far deeper root system in the resulting plants. This facilitates an improved ability for the rice plant to derive its required nutrients in times of drought via accessing deeper layers of soil, a feature demonstrated by trials which saw the IR64 + DRO1 rice yields drop by 10% under moderate drought conditions, compared to 60% for the unmodified IR64 variety.

Salt-tolerant rice
Soil salinity poses a major threat to rice crop productivity, particularly along low-lying coastal areas during the dry season. For example, roughly 1 million hectares (2.5 million acres) of the coastal areas of Bangladesh are affected by saline soils. These high concentrations of salt can severely affect rice plants' normal physiology, especially during early stages of growth, and as such farmers are often forced to abandon these otherwise potentially usable areas.

Progress has been made, however, in developing rice varieties capable of tolerating such conditions; the hybrid created from the cross between the commercial rice variety IR56 and the wild rice species Oryza coarctata is one example. O. coarctata is capable of successful growth in soils with double the limit of salinity of normal varieties, but lacks the ability to produce edible rice. Developed by the International Rice Research Institute, the hybrid variety can utilise specialised leaf glands that allow for the removal of salt into the atmosphere. It was initially produced from one successful embryo out of 34,000 crosses between the two species; this was then backcrossed to IR56 with the aim of preserving the genes responsible for salt tolerance that were inherited from O. coarctata. Extensive trials are planned prior to the new variety being available to farmers by approximately 2017–18. When the problem of soil salinity arises it will be opportune to select salt tolerant varieties (IRRI) or to resort to soil salinity control.

Soil salinity is often measured as the electric conductivity (EC) of the extract of a saturated soil paste (ECe). The EC units are usually expressed in decisiemens per metre or dS/m. The critical ECe value of 5.5 dS/m in the figure, obtained from measurements in farmers' fields, indicates that the rice crop is slightly salt sensitive.

Read more, here.

4758 Midway
Richvale, CA 95974

info@richvalenaturalfoods.com
530.882.4326

Contact Us
Website

Friday, June 3, 2022

High-yielding Varieties of Rice

The high-yielding varieties are a group of crops created intentionally during the Green Revolution to increase global food production. This project enabled labor markets in Asia to shift away from agriculture, and into industrial sectors. The first "Rice Car", IR8 was produced in 1966 at the International Rice Research Institute which is based in the Philippines at the University of the Philippines' Los Baños site. IR8 was created through a cross between an Indonesian variety named "Peta" and a Chinese variety named "Dee Geo Woo Gen."

Scientists have identified and cloned many genes involved in the gibberellin signaling pathway, including GAI1 (Gibberellin Insensitive) and SLR1 (Slender Rice). Disruption of gibberellin signaling can lead to significantly reduced stem growth leading to a dwarf phenotype. Photosynthetic investment in the stem is reduced dramatically as the shorter plants are inherently more stable mechanically. Assimilates become redirected to grain production, amplifying in particular the effect of chemical fertilizers on commercial yield. In the presence of nitrogen fertilizers, and intensive crop management, these varieties increase their yield two to three times.

Read more, here.

4758 Midway
Richvale, CA 95974

info@richvalenaturalfoods.com
530.882.4326

Contact Us
Website

Saturday, May 28, 2022

Rice : Ecotypes and Cultivars


While most rice is bred for crop quality and productivity, there are varieties selected for characteristics such as texture, smell, and firmness. There are four major categories of rice worldwide: indica, japonica, aromatic and glutinous. The different varieties of rice are not considered interchangeable, either in food preparation or agriculture, so as a result, each major variety is a completely separate market from other varieties. It is common for one variety of rice to rise in price while another one drops in price.

Rice cultivars also fall into groups according to environmental conditions, season of planting, and season of harvest, called ecotypes. Some major groups are the Japan-type (grown in Japan), "buly" and "tjereh" types (Indonesia); sali (or aman—main winter crop), ahu (also aush or ghariya, summer), and boro (spring) (Bengal and Assam). Cultivars exist that are adapted to deep flooding, and these are generally called "floating rice".

The largest collection of rice cultivars is at the International Rice Research Institute in the Philippines, with over 100,000 rice accessions held in the International Rice Genebank. Rice cultivars are often classified by their grain shapes and texture. For example, Thai Jasmine rice is long-grain and relatively less sticky, as some long-grain rice contains less amylopectin than short-grain cultivars. Chinese restaurants often serve long-grain as plain unseasoned steamed rice though short-grain rice is common as well. Japanese mochi rice and Chinese sticky rice are short-grain. Chinese people use sticky rice which is properly known as "glutinous rice" (note: glutinous refer to the glue-like characteristic of rice; does not refer to "gluten") to make zongzi. The Japanese table rice is a sticky, short-grain rice. Japanese sake rice is another kind as well.

Indian rice cultivars include long-grained and aromatic Basmati (ਬਾਸਮਤੀ) (grown in the North), long and medium-grained Patna rice, and in South India (Andhra Pradesh and Karnataka) short-grained Sona Masuri (also called as Bangaru theegalu). In the state of Tamil Nadu, the most prized cultivar is ponni which is primarily grown in the delta regions of the Kaveri River. Kaveri is also referred to as ponni in the South and the name reflects the geographic region where it is grown. In the Western Indian state of Maharashtra, a short grain variety called Ambemohar is very popular. This rice has a characteristic fragrance of Mango blossom.

Aromatic rices have definite aromas and flavors; the most noted cultivars are Thai fragrant rice, Basmati, Patna rice, Vietnamese fragrant rice, and a hybrid cultivar from America, sold under the trade name Texmati. Both Basmati and Texmati have a mild popcorn-like aroma and flavor. In Indonesia, there are also red and black cultivars.

High-yield cultivars of rice suitable for cultivation in Africa and other dry ecosystems, called the new rice for Africa (NERICA) cultivars, have been developed. It is hoped that their cultivation will improve food security in West Africa.

Draft genomes for the two most common rice cultivars, indica and japonica, were published in April 2002. Rice was chosen as a model organism for the biology of grasses because of its relatively small genome (~430 megabase pairs). Rice was the first crop with a complete genome sequence.

On December 16, 2002, the UN General Assembly declared the year 2004 the International Year of Rice. The declaration was sponsored by more than 40 countries.

Varietal development has ceremonial and historical significance for some cultures (see § Culture below). The Thai kings have patronised rice breeding since at least the reign of Chulalongkorn, and his great-great-grandson Vajiralongkorn released five particular rice varieties to celebrate his coronation.

Read more, here.

4758 Midway
Richvale, CA 95974

info@richvalenaturalfoods.com
530.882.4326

Contact Us
Website

Wednesday, May 25, 2022

Rice : Trade


World trade figures are very different from those for production, as less than 8% of rice produced is traded internationally. In economic terms, the global rice trade was a small fraction of 1% of world mercantile trade. Many countries consider rice as a strategic food staple, and various governments subject its trade to a wide range of controls and interventions.

Developing countries are the main players in the world rice trade, accounting for 83% of exports and 85% of imports. While there are numerous importers of rice, the exporters of rice are limited. Just five countries—Thailand, Vietnam, China, the United States and India—in decreasing order of exported quantities, accounted for about three-quarters of world rice exports in 2002. However, this ranking has been rapidly changing in recent years. In 2010, the three largest exporters of rice, in decreasing order of quantity exported were Thailand, Vietnam and India. By 2012, India became the largest exporter of rice with a 100% increase in its exports on year-to-year basis, and Thailand slipped to third position. Together, Thailand, Vietnam and India accounted for nearly 70% of the world rice exports.

The primary variety exported by Thailand and Vietnam were Jasmine rice, while exports from India included aromatic Basmati variety. China, an exporter of rice in early 2000s, was a net importer of rice in 2010 and will become the largest net importer, surpassing Nigeria, in 2013. According to a USDA report, the world's largest exporters of rice in 2012 were India (9.75 million metric tons (10.75 million short tons)), Vietnam (7 million metric tons (7.7 million short tons)), Thailand (6.5 million metric tons (7.2 million short tons)), Pakistan (3.75 million metric tons (4.13 million short tons)) and the United States (3.5 million metric tons (3.9 million short tons)).

Major importers usually include Nigeria, Indonesia, Bangladesh, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Iraq, Malaysia, the Philippines, Brazil and some African and Persian Gulf countries. In common with other West African countries, Nigeria is actively promoting domestic production. However, its very heavy import duties (110%) open it to smuggling from neighboring countries. Parboiled rice is particularly popular in Nigeria. Although China and India are the two largest producers of rice in the world, both countries consume the majority of the rice produced domestically, leaving little to be traded internationally.

Read more, here.

4758 Midway
Richvale, CA 95974

info@richvalenaturalfoods.com
530.882.4326

Contact Us
Website

Sunday, May 22, 2022

Soar Over the Lush Rice Terraces of the Philippines | National Geographic


In the remote Cordillera mountain range of the Philippines, rice terraces preserve a cultural landscape passed down for 2,000 years.

4758 Midway
Richvale, CA 95974

info@richvalenaturalfoods.com
530.882.4326

Contact Us
Website

Thursday, May 19, 2022

Harvesting, Drying and Milling

Unmilled rice, known as "paddy" (Indonesia and Malaysia: padi; Philippines, palay), is usually harvested when the grains have a moisture content of around 25%. In most Asian countries, where rice is almost entirely the product of smallholder agriculture, harvesting is carried out manually, although there is a growing interest in mechanical harvesting. Harvesting can be carried out by the farmers themselves, but is also frequently done by seasonal labor groups. Harvesting is followed by threshing, either immediately or within a day or two. Again, much threshing is still carried out by hand but there is an increasing use of mechanical threshers. Subsequently, paddy needs to be dried to bring down the moisture content to no more than 20% for milling.

A familiar sight in several Asian countries is paddy laid out to dry along roads. However, in most countries the bulk of drying of marketed paddy takes place in mills, with village-level drying being used for paddy to be consumed by farm families. Mills either sun dry or use mechanical driers or both. Drying has to be carried out quickly to avoid the formation of molds. Mills range from simple hullers, with a throughput of a couple of tonnes a day, that simply remove the outer husk, to enormous operations that can process 4 thousand metric tons (4.4 thousand short tons) a day and produce highly polished rice. A good mill can achieve a paddy-to-rice conversion rate of up to 72% but smaller, inefficient mills often struggle to achieve 60%. These smaller mills often do not buy paddy and sell rice but only service farmers who want to mill their paddy for their own consumption.

Read more, here.

4758 Midway
Richvale, CA 95974

info@richvalenaturalfoods.com
530.882.4326

Contact Us
Website

Monday, May 16, 2022

Processing of Rice

The seeds of the rice plant are first milled using a rice huller to remove the chaff (the outer husks of the grain) (see: rice hulls). At this point in the process, the product is called brown rice. The milling may be continued, removing the bran, i.e., the rest of the husk and the germ, thereby creating white rice. White rice, which keeps longer, lacks some important nutrients; moreover, in a limited diet which does not supplement the rice, brown rice helps to prevent the disease beriberi.

Either by hand or in a rice polisher, white rice may be buffed with glucose or talc powder (often called polished rice, though this term may also refer to white rice in general), parboiled, or processed into flour. White rice may also be enriched by adding nutrients, especially those lost during the milling process. While the cheapest method of enriching involves adding a powdered blend of nutrients that will easily wash off (in the United States, rice which has been so treated requires a label warning against rinsing), more sophisticated methods apply nutrients directly to the grain, coating the grain with a water-insoluble substance which is resistant to washing.

In some countries, a popular form, parboiled rice (also known as converted rice and easy-cook rice) is subjected to a steaming or parboiling process while still a brown rice grain. The parboil process causes a gelatinisation of the starch in the grains. The grains become less brittle, and the color of the milled grain changes from white to yellow. The rice is then dried, and can then be milled as usual or used as brown rice. Milled parboiled rice is nutritionally superior to standard milled rice, because the process causes nutrients from the outer husk (especially thiamine) to move into the endosperm, so that less is subsequently lost when the husk is polished off during milling. Parboiled rice has an additional benefit in that it does not stick to the pan during cooking, as happens when cooking regular white rice. This type of rice is eaten in parts of India and countries of West Africa are also accustomed to consuming parboiled rice.

Rice bran, called nuka in Japan, is a valuable commodity in Asia and is used for many daily needs. It is a moist, oily inner layer which is heated to produce oil. It is also used as a pickling bed in making rice bran pickles and takuan.

Raw rice may be ground into flour for many uses, including making many kinds of beverages, such as amazake, horchata, rice milk, and rice wine. Rice does not contain gluten, so is suitable for people on a gluten-free diet. Rice can be made into various types of noodles. Raw, wild, or brown rice may also be consumed by raw-foodist or fruitarians if soaked and sprouted (usually a week to 30 days – gaba rice).

Processed rice seeds must be boiled or steamed before eating. Boiled rice may be further fried in cooking oil or butter (known as fried rice), or beaten in a tub to make mochi.

Rice is a good source of protein and a staple food in many parts of the world, but it is not a complete protein: it does not contain all of the essential amino acids in sufficient amounts for good health, and should be combined with other sources of protein, such as nuts, seeds, beans, fish, or meat.

Rice, like other cereal grains, can be puffed (or popped). This process takes advantage of the grains' water content and typically involves heating grains in a special chamber. Further puffing is sometimes accomplished by processing puffed pellets in a low-pressure chamber. The ideal gas law means either lowering the local pressure or raising the water temperature results in an increase in volume prior to water evaporation, resulting in a puffy texture. Bulk raw rice density is about 0.9 g/cm3. It decreases to less than one-tenth that when puffed.

Read more, here.

4758 Midway
Richvale, CA 95974

info@richvalenaturalfoods.com
530.882.4326

Contact Us
Website

Friday, May 13, 2022

QUICK GARLIC TURMERIC RICE RECIPE FOR DINNER TONIGHT?


LEARN HOW TO COOK A GARLICKY GOLDEN TURMERIC RICE RECIPE TODAY!

LAY HO MA!  There's not much more comforting than a bowl of warm, delicious, fluffy rice.  This recipe is incredibly flavourful and simple to make.  Join me in this episode and learn how to cook a delightful bowl of garlic turmeric rice.  Let's begin

Ingredients:
6-7 pieces of garlic
1/2 onion
80g broccolini
1/4 red bell pepper
3 tbsp avocado oil
pinch crushed pepper flakes
1/4 cup corn
1 1/2 cups basmati rice (cooked)
1 tsp turmeric
pinch of salt

Directions:
1. Finely chop the garlic, onion, broccolini, and red bell pepper
2. Heat up a nonstick pan to medium low heat.  Add 2 tbsp of avocado oil
3. Cook the garlic and onions for 6-7min.  Add the crushed pepper flakes
4. Set the garlic and onions aside.  Heat the pan to medium heat and add 1 tbsp of avocado oil
5. Sauté the broccolini and red bell pepper for a couple of minutes.  Add the corn, basmati rice, turmeric, salt, and the cooked garlic and onions.  Sauté for 2-3min
6. Plate and sprinkle with some more crushed pepper flakes

4758 Midway
Richvale, CA 95974

info@richvalenaturalfoods.com
530.882.4326

Contact Us
Website

Tuesday, May 10, 2022

History of Cultivation

The history of rice cultivation is long and complicated. The current scientific consensus, based on archaeological and linguistic evidence, is that Oryza sativa rice was first domesticated in the Yangtze River basin in China 13,500 to 8,200 years ago. From that first cultivation, migration and trade spread rice around the world – first to much of east Asia, and then further abroad, and eventually to the Americas as part of the Columbian exchange. The now less common Oryza glaberrima rice was independently domesticated in Africa 3,000 to 3,500 years ago. Other wild rices have also been cultivated in different geographies, such as in the Americas.

Since its spread, rice has become a global staple crop important to food security and food cultures around the world. Local varieties of Oryza sativa have resulted in over 40,000 cultivars of various types. More recent changes in agricultural practices and breeding methods as part of the Green Revolution and other transfers of agricultural technologies has led to increased production in recent decades, with emergence of new types such as golden rice, which was genetically engineered to contain beta carotene.

Read more, here.

4758 Midway
Richvale, CA 95974

info@richvalenaturalfoods.com
530.882.4326

Contact Us
Website

Friday, May 6, 2022

Preparation of Rice

Rinsing rice before cooking removes much of the starch, thereby reducing the extent to which individual grains will stick together. This yields a fluffier rice, whereas not rinsing yields a stickier and creamier result. Rice produced in the US is usually fortified with vitamins and minerals, and rinsing will result in a loss of nutrients.

Rice may be soaked to decrease cooking time, conserve fuel, minimize exposure to high temperature, and reduce stickiness. For some varieties, soaking improves the texture of the cooked rice by increasing expansion of the grains. Rice may be soaked for 30 minutes up to several hours.

Brown rice may be soaked in warm water for 20 hours to stimulate germination. This process, called germinated brown rice (GBR), activates enzymes and enhances amino acids including gamma-aminobutyric acid to improve the nutritional value of brown rice. This method is a result of research carried out for the United Nations International Year of Rice.

Rice is cooked by boiling or steaming, and absorbs water during cooking. With the absorption method, rice may be cooked in a volume of water equal to the volume of dry rice plus any evaporation losses. With the rapid-boil method, rice may be cooked in a large quantity of water which is drained before serving. Rapid-boil preparation is not desirable with enriched rice, as much of the enrichment additives are lost when the water is discarded. Electric rice cookers, popular in Asia and Latin America, simplify the process of cooking rice. Rice (or any other grain) is sometimes quickly fried in oil or fat before boiling (for example saffron rice or risotto); this makes the cooked rice less sticky, and is a cooking style commonly called pilaf in Iran and Afghanistan or biryani in India and Pakistan.

Read more, here.

4758 Midway
Richvale, CA 95974

info@richvalenaturalfoods.com
530.882.4326

Contact Us
Website

Wednesday, May 4, 2022

How To Cook Perfect Rice Every Time


Here is what you'll need!

Rice Pilaf
Servings: 4

INGREDIENTS
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 shallot, finely chopped
1 cup white long grain rice
3 tablespoons white wine
1¾ cups chicken stock 
Pinch of salt

PREPARATION
In a small pot over high heat, add the olive oil.
Once the oil begins to shimmer, add the shallot, and cook until it begins to brown, stirring occasionally. 
Add the rice and stir to fully coat with oil and shallots. Add the wine and stir to combine.
Add the chicken stock and salt and bring to a boil. 
Once boiling, put a lid on the pot and reduce the heat to simmer. Cook for 18 minutes.
Remove the pot from the heat and let steam for 10 minutes.
Enjoy!

4758 Midway
Richvale, CA 95974

info@richvalenaturalfoods.com
530.882.4326

Contact Us
Website

Sunday, May 1, 2022

CALIFORNIA LONG GRAIN RICE

Our long grain rice is low in fat with no artificial colors or flavors. This type is extremely versatile and can be used in any side dish.

  • Non-GMO
  • Gluten Free
  • Vegan
  • Locally grown

4758 Midway

Richvale, CA 95974

info@richvalenaturalfoods.com
530.882.4326

Contact Us
Website


Thursday, April 28, 2022

Monday, April 25, 2022

Friday, April 22, 2022

What is Rice?


Rice is the seed of the grass species Oryza sativa (Asian rice) or less commonly Oryza glaberrima (African rice). The name wild rice is usually used for species of the genera Zizania and Porteresia, both wild and domesticated, although the term may also be used for primitive or uncultivated varieties of Oryza.

As a cereal grain, domesticated rice is the most widely consumed staple food for over half of the world's human population,[Liu 1] especially in Asia and Africa. It is the agricultural commodity with the third-highest worldwide production, after sugarcane and maize.[1] Since sizable portions of sugarcane and maize crops are used for purposes other than human consumption, rice is the most important food crop with regard to human nutrition and caloric intake, providing more than one-fifth of the calories consumed worldwide by humans.[2] There are many varieties of rice and culinary preferences tend to vary regionally.

The traditional method for cultivating rice is flooding the fields while, or after, setting the young seedlings. This simple method requires sound irrigation planning but reduces the growth of less robust weed and pest plants that have no submerged growth state, and deters vermin. While flooding is not mandatory for the cultivation of rice, all other methods of irrigation require higher effort in weed and pest control during growth periods and a different approach for fertilizing the soil.

Rice, a monocot, is normally grown as an annual plant, although in tropical areas it can survive as a perennial and can produce a ratoon crop for up to 30 years.[3] Rice cultivation is well-suited to countries and regions with low labor costs and high rainfall, as it is labor-intensive to cultivate and requires ample water. However, rice can be grown practically anywhere, even on a steep hill or mountain area with the use of water-controlling terrace systems. Although its parent species are native to Asia and certain parts of Africa, centuries of trade and exportation have made it commonplace in many cultures worldwide. Production and consumption of rice is estimated to have been responsible for 4% of global greenhouse gas emissions in 2010.

Read more, here.

4758 Midway
Richvale, CA 95974

info@richvalenaturalfoods.com
530.882.4326

Contact Us
Website

Tuesday, April 19, 2022

Who We Are

We are a small, Family run food company. Proudly growing California rice for over 100 years, we grow and mill our own rice. Delivering it to you Fresh from our farm. 

Richvale Natural Foods takes the meaning of farm-to-fork to a whole new level. We are a family company run by one full-time farmer. Our farming heritage dates back to the early 1900’s, when our town of Richvale was just a small village.

Over 100 years of rice farming later, our relatives have laid the foundation for Richvale Natural Foods today. Everything is done on-site, from planting to packaging. This guarantees that you get the freshest rice possible on your table.

We look forward to producing California rice for many years to come.

4758 Midway
Richvale, CA 95974

info@richvalenaturalfoods.com
530.882.4326

Contact Us
Website

Saturday, April 16, 2022

Happy Easter From Richvale Natural Foods

 


Richvale Natural Foods takes the meaning of farm-to-fork to a whole new level. We are a family company run by one full-time farmer. Our farming heritage dates back to the early 1900’s, when our town of Richvale was just a small village.

Over 100 years of rice farming later, our relatives have laid the foundation for Richvale Natural Foods today. Everything is done on-site, from planting to packaging. This guarantees that you get the freshest rice possible on your table.

We look forward to producing California rice for many years to come.

Tuesday, April 12, 2022

California Basmati Rice

A fragrant basmati type known as "Calmati" in California. We are the only rice farm to grow this unique variety in recent years. An excellent locally-grown alternative, our quality is comparable to that of truly authentic basmati from India.

  • Superior Quality
  • Non-GMO
  • Vegan
  • Gluten-Free
  • Locally Grown

Saturday, April 9, 2022

California Jasmine Rice

An aromatic long grain rice with lineage that traces back to Thailand. This particular variety is brand new to California and is exclusive to Richvale Natural Foods.

  • True Jasmine
  • Non-GMO
  • Vegan
  • Gluten-Free
  • Locally Grown

Tuesday, April 5, 2022

Saturday, April 2, 2022

Meet Our Farmer

Our farmer, Randall Mattson, was born and raised in Richvale. He is a second generation farmer. At age 18 he began working in food processing until he began farming in 1977. He grows it, mills it, and packages it all here on his farm. He does it all! Randall’s mission is less about earning profits, and more about educating consumers about the different varieties and qualities of rice.

Randall maintains a high standard of ethics, both in his farming and his business. He understands the importance of practicing sustainable farming, and he takes great pride in providing you with the best natural and organic rice products available.

Sunday, March 27, 2022

Old-Fashioned Rice Pudding

INGREDIENTS

6 cups whole milk, divided

1/2 cup sugar1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup long grain white rice, I use a heaping half cup

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

ground cinnamon, optional

INSTRUCTIONS

In a large saucepan, combine 5 1/2 cups milk, sugar, and salt. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat.
Stir in rice and reduce heat to low. Be sure to adjust the heat so that it is at a gentle simmer.
Stirring occasionally, cook for 50 to 60 minutes. Mixture should thicken up to consistency of yogurt. Once thickened, remove from heat and stir in vanilla.

Let cool and then refrigerate. The last 1/2 cup milk is stirred in just before serving. Sprinkle with cinnamon if desired.

Recipe Source: Spicy Southern Kitchen

Thursday, March 24, 2022

Outrageously delicious Rice MEALS for Dinner Tonight!

Think beyond fried rice – here’s my top 20 rice recipes that are rice meals for dinner! For all those times you’re wondering what to make with rice, I’m betting you’ve got everything you need to make at least one of these right now.

From an epic One Pot Greek Chicken and Rice, to a colourful beef and rice, stuffed peppers and rice soup, the one thing all these have in common other than RICE is that they’re easy to make and Can’t-Stop-Eating-It delicious.

Recipe Source: Recipetineats


Monday, March 21, 2022

Mushroom Rice


Rice with Mushrooms recipe video!
Note the part where I add some of the broth to deglaze the pot
and it turns a dark brown colour, that’s why my rice is brown (and extra tasty!)

Friday, March 18, 2022

Curried Rice


A fabulous Basmati rice recipe, loaded with curry flavours.
This will jazz up any meal! 
Get full recipe here

Monday, March 14, 2022

Turmeric Jasmine Rice Recipe Made In The Instant Pot With Roasted Chicken

Are you a foodie in love with delicious foods from just about everywhere? If yes, try our Middle Eastern-inspired Turmeric Jasmine Rice recipe made in the Instant Pot with Roasted Chicken, and you may have a new favorite easy rice recipe to add to your dinner line-up!

Being a foodie is all about tasting delicious foods from across the globe; to limit your options to only the foods you’re familiar with isn’t what being a foodie is all about. Being a lover of food is about exploration, as it is about appreciating good food regardless of its origins. Our Turmeric Jasmine Rice using leftover roasted chicken, is a nod to middle eastern food fare. It pays homage to some of the best rice dishes I have loved ever since I first tried middle eastern saffron rice for Lebanon rice or lentils and rice with caramelized onions. Every one of these rice dishes is worth seeking out if you haven’t tried them.

Get the recipe here

Tuesday, March 8, 2022

Easy Thai Basil Chicken - Only 15 minutes (Pad Kra Pao)


This Thai Basil Chicken is perfect when the hankering for Thai food strikes and that's all you want! Its fast, easy and you don't need to go hunting for ingredients. Also called pad kra pao in Thai, its a popular dish when you visit Thailand thats available at every street corner. It can be made with ground chicken or cubed chicken thighs. It has a short ingredient list and super fast prep. It's the perfect candidate for 15 minute weeknight dinners!

Saturday, March 5, 2022

Rice, Rice, Rice...



rice, (Oryza sativa), edible starchy cereal grain and the grass plant (family Poaceae) by which it is produced. Roughly one-half of the world population, including virtually all of East and Southeast Asia, is wholly dependent upon rice as a staple food; 95 percent of the world’s rice crop is eaten by humans. Rice is cooked by boiling, or it can be ground into a flour. It is eaten alone and in a great variety of soups, side dishes, and main dishes in Asian, Middle Eastern, and many other cuisines. Other products in which rice is used are breakfast cereals, noodles, and such alcoholic beverages as Japanese sake.

Physical description

The cultivated rice plant is an annual grass and grows to about 1.2 metres (4 feet) in height. The leaves are long and flattened and are borne on hollow stems. The fibrous root system is often broad and spreading. The panicle, or inflorescence (flower cluster), is made up of spikelets bearing flowers that produce the fruit, or grain. Varieties differ greatly in the length, shape, and weight of the panicle and the overall productivity of a given plant.

In the 1960s the so-called Green Revolution, an international scientific effort to diminish the threat of world hunger, produced improved strains of numerous food crops, including that known as miracle rice. Bred for disease resistance and increased productivity, this variety is characterized by a short sturdy stalk that minimizes loss from drooping. Poor soil conditions and other factors, however, inhibited its anticipated widespread success.

Source: Britannica

Wednesday, March 2, 2022

The Fascinating World of Rice

With over forty thousand known varieties in the world, it’s often difficult to distinguish the many types of rice. Color of rice is not the only variable to consider. Its length, shape, texture, and aroma can all differ in multiple ways. But most importantly, the uses of rice in different kitchens across the world have almost limitless possibilities.

Here is a guide to several types of rice, some health benefits that come with certain varieties, and how they’re most commonly used in different cultures.

Basmati Rice

Basmati rice: the usual accompanist to the Tikka Masala dishes that we eat at Crystal. This long grain is a major player in Indian cuisine, featuring in curries, pilafs, braised meats, and more. Originally cultivated and grown in India and Pakistan, basmati comes from the Hindi word for “fragrant”. The intensely floral and nutty flavor and aroma of basmati rice makes its name a fitting one. It is also mainly characterized by its strong scent, which comes from a long aging process. Its texture is non-sticky, allowing curry or other sauces to coat each grain for maximum flavor. Both skinny and fluffy, basmati rice is perfect for sauces needing a carbohydrate companion.

Check out the large selection here

Sunday, February 27, 2022

Are Rice Cakes Healthy?

In short, yes, rice cakes are a healthy snack. They are simple and allergen-friendly, so you can enjoy them if you are gluten-free, nut-free or soy-free. They contain no animal products, making them perfect for vegans and vegetarians too. From a nutrition perspective, rice cakes are low in calories and nutrients so they are best when paired with other foods to help round out your snack. While brown rice cakes are technically a whole grain, they don't offer much by way of fiber. Choose whichever type of rice you prefer or mix it up with a variety pack. Rice cakes can also be stored on the shelf and are an affordable option from many grocers, so they are perfect if you are on a budget. 

Rice cake snack ideas on Eating Well

Monday, February 21, 2022

Health Benefits of Rice

Rice is such an important food in some countries that "to eat" means "to eat rice." Nearly half of the people in the world get approximately 50% of their calories from rice. Without rice, or something to take the place of rice, many people would go hungry.

Botanically, rice is the seed of an aquatic grass. It has been cultivated for more than 8,000 years. The Latin name for rice is Oryza sativa. There are many varieties of rice, such as arborio, jasmine, and basmati. It also comes in red, black, and purple, with the colors coming from pigments in the bran layer. The more you learn about the different types of rice, the more you'll appreciate this simple food. 

CLICK HERE to read more about the benefits.

Tuesday, February 15, 2022

Baked Mushroom Rice


Butter and garlickly, golden brown roasted mushrooms with fluffy rice made in one pan!

Saturday, February 12, 2022

Jasmine Rice with Coconut & Cherries

INGREDIENTS

2-1/2 cups water
1 tablespoon olive oil
3/4 teaspoon salt
1-1/2 cups uncooked jasmine rice
1/3 cup dried cherries
1/4 cup chopped salted peanuts
1 teaspoon grated orange zest
1/4 cup sweetened shredded coconut, toasted

DIRECTIONS

In a large saucepan, bring water, oil and salt to a boil. Stir in rice; return to a boil, stirring once. Reduce heat; simmer, covered, until water is absorbed, 15-17 minutes.

Stir in cherries, peanuts and orange zest; let stand, covered, 10 minutes. Sprinkle with coconut.

Recipe source: Taste of Home

Thursday, February 10, 2022

Perfect Jasmine Rice

Named after the sweet-smelling jasmine flower, jasmine rice is a long grain rice native to Thailand with a delicate floral and buttery scent. The secret to cooking it perfectly is getting the right ratio of water to rice. Typically, the instructions on the package call for 1-1/2 cups water for every 1 cup of rice. That’s fine if you like your rice “al dente” but I prefer mine soft, so I always add a bit more water. Many recipes call for rinsing the grains before cooking but I don’t think it’s necessary — even when you rinse jasmine rice, the grains have a slightly sticky texture and cling together.

Perfect Jasmine Rice
By Jennifer Segal

With the right water to rice ratio, you can make fragrant, perfectly cooked jasmine rice every time.

Servings: 4-6

Total Time: 20 Minutes

INGREDIENTS

2-3/4 cups water, plus more if necessary
1-1/2 cups jasmine rice
3/4 teaspoon salt

INSTRUCTIONS

Bring the water to a boil in a medium saucepan. Stir in the rice and the salt; cover and reduce the heat to low. Simmer for 15 minutes until all of the water is absorbed. Taste the rice; if it is still too firm, add a few more tablespoons of water. Cover the pan and let the rice absorb the water off of the heat.

Freezer-Friendly Instructions: This rice can be frozen in an airtight container for up to 3 months. (Putting it in a flat layer in sealable plastic bags works well as it will take up less space in the freezer.) No need to thaw before reheating; remove it from the freezer and reheat in the microwave with 1 to 2 Tbsp. of water.

GLUTEN-FREE ADAPTABLE NOTE

To the best of my knowledge, all of the ingredients used in this recipe are gluten-free or widely available in gluten-free versions. There is hidden gluten in many foods; if you're following a gluten-free diet or cooking for someone with gluten allergies, always read the labels of your ingredients to verify that they are gluten-free.

Recipe source

Saturday, February 5, 2022

You've been cooking Jasmine Rice wrong your whole life


Jasmine rice is softer than other white rice. So you only need 1 1/4 cups of water for every 1 cup of rice.

Also, if you buy your rice retail and you use 1 1/4 cups of water, it's totally fluffy whether you rinse or not.

In fact, if you rinse, you have to reduce the water by 2 tablespoons.

I did side by side taste tests, and the difference was barely noticeable. Rinsing rice is a pain. Skip it - just use the right amount of water!

CAVEAT: If you guy direct from rice farmers or other places not retail (ie in shiny plastic packets) then you MUST RINSE to clean it :)

Thursday, February 3, 2022

What Is the Difference Between Jasmine and Basmati Rice?

Ah, rice. A hardworking yet humble grain, often overlooked as a beautiful thing in its own right and valued most as a supporting player—and it is great at propping up other dishes.

There are more than 40,000 types of rice cultivated in the world (from arborio to carnaroli, sticky to sushi, black to brown, and white to wild (which is actually a type of grass)), but today, let’s look at two of the most common and beguiling examples: jasmine and basmati rice.

Jasmine rice hails from Thailand, while basmati comes from India and Pakistan. They are both of the long grain variety, which means they cook up fluffy and not very sticky, so their grains remain distinct, although jasmine is plumper, softer, and a bit more moist than basmati, which has a firmer chew and drier character.

Basmati grains are extra long and thin, and many sources say they benefit from soaking, whereas the shorter, wider grains of jasmine rice just need a few quick rinses to remove excess starch (and you can even skip this step if you are really lazy don’t mind a bit more stickiness).

Both basmati and jasmine rice are especially aromatic, sharing the 2-Acetyl-1-pyrroline compound that gives them both a pandan-like or popcorn-esque aroma, but basmati has a nuttier quality, while jasmine rice is more faintly floral.

Continue reading @ greatist.com

Tuesday, February 1, 2022

Perfect Basmati Rice


Basmati is a fragrant, nutty-tasting long grain rice grown in the Himalayas and Pakistan. “Bas” in Hindi language means “aroma” and “mati” means “full of,” hence the word Basmati — or “full of aroma.” The key to making basmati rice that is light, tender and fluffy is to rinse it first, otherwise, the grains will be gummy and stick together. It only takes a minute or two. Simply place the rice in a bowl with water, and then swish it around to release any excess starch. The water will be cloudy at first but after several rinses, it will be clear.

Check out this simple recipe from Once Upon a Chef

Sunday, January 30, 2022

Rice Varieties In California


Family rice farmer Jessica Lundberg of Butte County discusses different types of rice growing in California.

Thursday, January 27, 2022

Rice Stomper In Action


A stomper in action at a Sutter County rice field. This incorporates the rice straw into the ground to help it break down. The birds also love it, as it kicks up food for them to eat! Jim Morris video.

Monday, January 24, 2022

Cajun Shrimp and Rice | Food Network


Get a taste of the Bayou with this flavorful Cajun shrimp recipe.

Cajun Shrimp and Rice
Recipe courtesy of Food Network Kitchen
Total: 20 min
Prep: 14 min
Cook: 6 min
Yield: 4 servings
Level: Easy

Ingredients

1 tablespoon unsalted butter
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 teaspoons Cajun seasoning
1 pound large shrimp, peeled and deveined, tails intact
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
4 plum tomatoes, chopped
2 bunches scallions, chopped
3 cups cooked white rice
3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
Lemon wedges, for serving (optional)

Directions

Heat the butter, olive oil and garlic in a large skillet over medium-high heat until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the Cajun seasoning and shrimp and cook, stirring, until the shrimp begin to curl, about 1 minute. Season with salt and pepper.

Add the tomatoes and scallions to the skillet and cook, stirring, about 1 minute. Add the rice and 1/4 cup water and continue to cook until the rice is warmed through and the shrimp are opaque, about 3 more minutes. Stir in the parsley and serve with lemon, if desired.

Per serving: Calories 357; Fat 11 g (Saturated 3 g); Cholesterol 176 mg; Sodium 537 mg; Carbohydrate 40 g; Fiber 3 g; Protein 23 g

Photograph by Antonis Achilleos

Courtesy Food Network Magazine

Friday, January 21, 2022

Rice Risotto By Martha Stewart


A well-made risotto is a culinary feat and Martha will show you how to master it.

Tuesday, January 18, 2022

The Difference Between Brown Rice & White Rice!


I get this question a lot: what's the difference between brown rice and white rice? The answer is, in short, nutrition--and that's based on the amount the rice kernel has been processed. In this video, we look at paddy rice in comparison to both brown and white rice.

Saturday, January 15, 2022

About Richvale Natural Foods

 



Richvale Natural Foods takes the meaning of farm-to-fork to a whole new level. We are a family company run by one full-time farmer. Our farming heritage dates back to the early 1900s when our town of Richvale was just a small village.

Over 100 years of rice farming later, our relatives have laid the foundation for Richvale Natural Foods today. Everything is done on-site, from planting to packaging. This guarantees that you get the freshest rice possible on your table.

We look forward to producing California rice for many years to come.